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You can read the following articles on this site.

End of the Reel by Colleen Hubbard in Issue 40 (2014-04-10)
Stock footage archives persist in the era of digital media.
Attention Mining by John Moltz in Issue 39 (2014-03-27)
Minecraft videos build an enormous audience.
How to Move a Wood Bison by Jenna Schnuer in Issue 38 (2014-03-13)
The chutes, ladders, and waiting games behind a plan to restore a giant mammal to Alaska.
Radium Hound by Theresa Everline in Issue 37 (2014-02-27)
A responsible dealer of a radioactive element once pushed as a quack cure tried to keep the genie in the bottle.
Ramen Fever by Matthew Amster-Burton in Issue 36 (2014-02-13)
A case of norovirus gave him a second family.
The Slow Selfie by April Kilcrease in Issue 36 (2014-02-13)
An antique method of making photographic prints reveals more than meets the eye.
Balancing without a Net by Chris Stokel-Walker in Issue 35 (2014-01-30)
For the voiceless, social media provides a support network — and a bullhorn.
New Disruptors 58 and 59 by Glenn Fleishman in Issue 35 (2014-01-30)
A look at our Kickstarter campaign; turtles teach programming.
New Disruptors 56 and 57 by The Editor in Issue 34 (2014-01-16)
Podcast episodes about a women-oriented makerspace and printing photos under glass.
Paging Dr. MacGyver by Julian Smith in Issue 34 (2014-01-16)
The rise of DIY medical devices.
Last Words by Glenn Fleishman in Issue 33 (2014-01-02)
“I love you,” his mother said, when he thought she was beyond speech.
New Disruptors 54 and 55 by The Editor in Issue 33 (2014-01-02)
Podcast episodes about crowdfunding T-shirts and the Boing Boing editors interviewed.
Unipiper by Chris Higgins in Issue 33 (2014-01-02)
Portland’s bagpiping, Darth Vader mask wearing, unicycling hero.
Graffiti Hunters by April Kilcrease in Issue 32 (2013-12-19)
Tracking the wily urban explorer via Instagram shots.
New Disruptors 52 and 53 by Glenn Fleishman in Issue 32 (2013-12-19)
Podcast episodes about App Camp for Girls and our one-year show anniversary.
Good to the Last Drop by Jen A. Miller in Issue 31 (2013-12-05)
Caffeine has a potential role in marathon deaths by heart attack.
The Magazine: The Book by Brittany Shoot in Issue 31 (2013-12-05)
You may have heard we’re making a book, and that we need your help to bring it into being.
Sint’s Abilities by Lianne Bergeron in Issue 30 (2013-11-21)
A Canadian embraces a Dutch holiday tradition while keeping her own.
Blinded by the Light by Chris Krupiarz in Issue 29 (2013-11-07)
A probe hurtling towards Mercury stops talking.
His Life Aquatic by Elisabeth Eaves in Issue 28 (2013-10-24)
A practical tiny sub can dive as deeply as 3,300 feet.
Pilgrims’ Progress by Cara Parks in Issue 27 (2013-10-10)
A woman grew up repeating the past at Plimoth Plantation.
Redshirts in the Coffee Shop by Gabe Bullard in Issue 26 (2013-09-26)
This cosplay is pretty serious.
Just Desert by Colleen Hubbard in Issue 25 (2013-09-12)
Africa, a devil, and Burning Man meet in Eastern Europe’s little desert.
Look Within by Lisa Schmeiser in Issue 24 (2013-08-29)
We can be responsible for machines.
Potpourri by Michelle Goodman in Issue 23 (2013-08-15)
The $63,000 machine that transforms pot plants into concentrates.
Hoe Down by Cara Parks in Issue 22 (2013-08-01)
Small-scale farmers have turned to high tech to invent the tools they need.
A Beacon of Hope by John Patrick Pullen in Issue 21 (2013-07-18)
A dying city glows with optimism over its plan for a giant lava lamp.
Flaws and All by Manjula Martin in Issue 20 (2013-07-04)
John Vanderslice adores digital technology — except when it comes to audio.
A Bicycle Built for Six by Lianne Bergeron in Issue 19 (2013-06-20)
The Netherlands has elevated bikes far above cars in the transportation hierarchy.
Restoration Hardware by Gabe Bullard in Issue 18 (2013-06-06)
Analog tech is kept alive by aging experts and an abundance of cannibalized parts.
Meet the Meat by Colleen Hubbard in Issue 17 (2013-05-23)
Have a fine meal of beef and context at California’s largest feedlot.
Peak Experience by Rich Mogull in Issue 16 (2013-05-09)
A mountain rescue still reverberates a decade later.
Mechanically Attached by Morgen Jahnke in Issue 15 (2013-04-25)
A coin-operated museum proves common ground between a litterateur and a geek.
Choose Your Character by Brianna Wu in Issue 14 (2013-04-11)
Faced with change, an all-female indie dev team evolves to a higher form.
Unbound Pages by John D. Berry in Issue 13 (2013-03-28)
Text has leaped free of physical constraints, but designers still trail.
Ain’t No Reason by Lex Friedman in Issue 12 (2013-03-14)
A mother tongue spoken by millions of Americans still gets no respect.
Death of a Code Man by Jane Hodges in Issue 11 (2013-02-28)
I knew my father was dying when he gave me his AOL password.
Fraindship Rings by Saba Imtiaz in Issue 10 (2013-02-14)
Women in Pakistan cannot avoid torrents of texts from unknown men.
Gender Binder by Glenn Fleishman in Issue 10 (2013-02-14)
The Magazine has published thirty-six men and six women so far.
Re-Enabled by Steven Aquino in Issue 9 (2013-01-31)
iOS’s impact on those with impairments isn’t just a marketing slide; it’s profound.
Bit Bucket by Mark Donohoe in Issue 8 (2013-01-17)
A betrayal at the end of Bill’s life led to a second death as his digital self was scattered to the four winds.
The Professionalization of Pot by Alison Hallett in Issue 6 (2012-12-20)
Former tokers may be more baffled by maryjane’s many varieties than befuddled by higher potency.
How He Met My Mother by Jason Snell in Issue 5 (2012-12-06)
The unlikely sequences that lead to a new life.
You Are Boring by Scott Simpson in Issue 4 (2012-11-22)
Tell me more about your food blog, please.
My Cup of Tea by Dan Moren in Issue 3 (2012-11-08)
The forgotten art of proper tea.
Cautiously Optimistic by Alex Knight in Issue 2 (2012-10-25)
The early days of Twitter and App.net.
Falling From The Friendly Skies by Daniel Rutter in Issue 2 (2012-10-25)
How did Felix Baumgartner break the sound barrier by falling?
How to Make a Baby by Gina Trapani in Issue 2 (2012-10-25)
The path to parenthood isn’t always straightforward.
Obvious by Marco Arment in Issue 2 (2012-10-25)
An update on *The Magazine*.
Strange Game by John Siracusa in Issue 2 (2012-10-25)
Journey’s lessons can apply to all of human endeavor.
The Wet Shave by Lex Friedman in Issue 2 (2012-10-25)
A relaxing, rewarding, and self-indulgent morning routine.
Alone Together, Again by Alex Payne in Issue 1 (2012-10-11)
Technology is just people. And sometimes, we get it wrong.
Baseball Misfits by Jason Snell in Issue 1 (2012-10-11)
There’s a weird schism between geeks who love sports and those who don’t.
Fireballed by Guy English in Issue 1 (2012-10-11)
It’s not just “Linkblogs” that have become popular: it’s the Fireball Format.
Stables and Volatiles by Michael Lopp in Issue 1 (2012-10-11)
Your job as a leader is to nurture this disruption.

The Magazine on Medium

A bit of twine transformed between two hands is an ice breaker that transcends cultures and languages.
Baseball Misfits by Jason Snell (March 5, 2014)
There’s a weird schism between geeks who love sports and those who don’t.
Originally appeared in Issue 1, October 11, 2012.
Mexico is determined to convert its patrimony into digital form on its own terms.
Small Instruction Set by Ciara Byrne (March 3, 2014)
CoderDojo promotes self-directed learning and local mentors to help kids teach themselves to program.
Radium Hound by Theresa Everline (February 27, 2014)
A responsible dealer of a radioactive element once pushed as a quack cure tried to keep the genie in the bottle.
Ski(d) Marks by Rob Pegoraro (February 26, 2014)
A little pavement won’t stop Rob Pegoraro from cross-country skiing across his city.
Matthew Amster-Burton contends with the messy reality of books in an elementary-school library
Eggs Terminate by Jen A. Miller (February 19, 2014)
A faster, egg-free flu vaccine becomes available to those with allergies, including reporter Jen A. Miller.
Quality Time by John Moltz (February 19, 2014)
It’s time to stand up for what’s important: not you.
Originally appeared in Issue 5, December 6, 2012.
Atlanta’s urban form doesn’t cope well with ice storms. That doesn’t mean it’s going to change any time soon.
Pay Caesar His Due by Glenn Fleishman (February 18, 2014)
Sorting out the taxing dilemma of paying taxes on crowdfunding campaigns at Kickstarter and beyond.
The Birth of the Cool by Colleen Hubbard (February 14, 2014)
San Francisco’s original scenester looks back on a half century of bohemian life with Colleen Hubbard.
The Slow Selfie by April Kilcrease (February 13, 2014)
An antique method of making photographic prints reveals more than meets the eye. April Kilcrease shows us why.
Originally appeared in Issue 36, February 13, 2014.
An interview with a digital maverick, whose analog roots are showing in his latest book. Audio and transcript.
The evolution of an illustration with Adam Koford.
To Have and Not Hold by Colleen Hubbard (February 10, 2014)
A hippie, an anarchist, and a start-up define freeness and sharing in a time of excess.
Originally appeared in Issue 35, January 30, 2014.
Fertile Ground for Apps by Natali Morris (February 10, 2014)
Natali Morris turns to her smartphone for contraception to avoid the pill, IUDs, and other options — and their unpleasant side effects.
Winding Down by Tom Bentley (February 7, 2014)
A clockmaker counts his remaining ticks and tocks, writes Tom Bentley.
Hello Kitty by Carren Jao (February 6, 2014)
Cat cafes provide comfort, Carren Jao finds — that is, if you take the cat’s fancy.
Roll for Initiative by Scott McNulty (February 4, 2014)
Scott McNulty casts a spell of +10 confidence.
Originally appeared in Issue 14, April 11, 2013.
Heart Shut Tight by Kellie M. Walsh (February 3, 2014)
Marian Call and The Magazine’s Kellie M. Walsh go on a songwriting tangent and discover love.
Bipolar Explorer by Jeff Porten (January 28, 2014)
Jeff Porten discovers that sanity has its downsides.
Shifting from Shelves to Snowflakes by Alex Duner (January 27, 2014)
Libraries shift from consumption into creation with makerspaces. Alex Duner checks it out.
Posh Privies by Carren Jao (January 24, 2014)
Carren Jao enjoys the luxury of the typical Japanese toilet alongside the severe simplicity of a pit.
Game of Clones by Chris Higgins (January 23, 2014)
Chris Higgins looks into how the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine is fixing link rot.
Marc Andreessen was a big part of turning the Web into a mainstream experience, but seems to misunderstand Bitcoin profoundly, writes Glenn Fleishman.
Naked Face by Jen A. Miller (January 20, 2014)
Jen A. Miller has grown to enjoy facing the world without a mask.
Brittany Shoot suggests you consider what you owe America’s western expansion the next time you patronize a food truck.
Paging Dr. MacGyver by Julian Smith (January 16, 2014)
Julian Smith tracks the rise of DIY medical devices.
Originally appeared in Issue 34, January 16, 2014.
Penguin Propulsion by Jen A. Miller (January 15, 2014)
The emperor penguin rockets itself through the water with a unique shoulder joint; Jen A. Miller talks to a scientist who is testing a robotic version.
Graffiti Hunters by April Kilcrease (January 13, 2014)
April Kilcrease tags along to track the wily urban explorer via Instagram shots
Originally appeared in Issue 32, December 19, 2013.
The proprietors of bodegas, off-licenses, and the lot know us intimately, says Rosie J. Spinks.
The idea by Meg McGrath Vaccaro (January 11, 2014)
The story of a stupid girl in STEM.
Thinstagram by Scott Neumyer (January 8, 2014)
Social media sites allow pro-eating-disorder communities to thrive despite policies designed to thwart them, explains Scott Neumyer
A book contains its own reading hardware and it’s not going anywhere soon, grumpy old man Glenn Fleishman writes.
Game developer Brianna Wu explains why women remain a small part of the voting for 2013’s best video game.
Brianna Wu shares feedback from games publications and forums, and clarifies a few points.
Untarred by Chris Krupiarz (January 3, 2014)
Chris Krupiarz nearly deleted his future.
Cat Fancy by Alison Hallett (January 1, 2014)
Is a future cat made of fur or plastic, ponders Alison Hallett, as she pays the latest vet bill.
Originally appeared in Issue 29, November 7, 2013.
Ramen Fever by Matthew Amster-Burton (December 29, 2013)
Matthew Amster-Burton went to Fukuoka to eat ramen, but a case of norovirus gave him a second family.
Beard and Bearder by Art Allen (December 27, 2013)
Scores of hirsute men descend on Minneapolis to compare follicular feats.
Originally appeared in Issue 22, August 1, 2013.
Every Day I Write the Song by Jonathan Mann (December 27, 2013)
There are two billion people floating around out there. You don’t have to reach all of them every time you make something. Sometimes, you only need to reach one, Jonathan Mann recounts.
I Dream of Conniff by Jen A. Miller (December 24, 2013)
The singer and his troupe of dozens fondly remind Jen A. Miller of a past she knows never existed.
There’s a knife for that, Matthew Amster-Burton discovers, just before missing his flight.
Don’t Call Us by Nancy Gohring (December 17, 2013)
Nancy Gohring makes a first-world choice in a third-world country.
Blurred Visionnaire by Gabe Bullard (December 16, 2013)
Is one of the most successful pen projects on Kickstarter a bulk order from China? Gabe Bullard draws a line between the dots.
Penultimate by Gabe Bullard (December 16, 2013)
Might as well face it: you’re addicted to pens. Gabe Bullard uses a fine point to explain.
Originally appeared in Issue 24, August 29, 2013.
Can you really fall in love with someone who you’ve never met in person? What if they don’t exist at all?
Originally appeared in Issue 27, October 10, 2013.
How He Met My Mother by Jason Snell (December 11, 2013)
The unlikely sequences that lead to a new life.
Originally appeared in Issue 5, December 6, 2012.
A Sore Spot by Chris Stokel-Walker (December 11, 2013)
New mothers can feel self-conscious feeding their children in public. Chris Stokel-Walker discovers there’s an app for that.
A new study provides a basis for the degree to which copper and its alloys reduce hospital-acquired infection, Jen A. Miller explains.
Launch in T-minus the spot on the road where you’re still in a bus a few minutes away, Chris Krupiarz recounts.
Good to the Last Drop by Jen A. Miller (December 5, 2013)
Caffeine has a potential role in marathon deaths by heart attack, Jen A. Miller writes. Runners need to know how to self-medicate this drug.
Originally appeared in Issue 31, December 5, 2013.
I don’t precisely blame the author for the brain freeze that cost me $10,000 or more on “Jeopardy!” And yet…
Over two centuries ago two brothers sent humans flying for the first time. As Chris Stokel-Walker finds, their achievement is still celebrated today.
As many travel to their families for Thanksgiving, Rosie J. Spinks tells what it’s like when travelling becomes a kind of home.
Penny Ante by Glenn Fleishman (November 27, 2013)
The webcomics, gaming event, and reality web TV company wants you as its underpaid, overworked, cherished employee in its offensive office.
Jenny McCarthy may have a megaphone, but the Kardashian clan has a posse, pediatrician Saul R. Hymes explains.
A Model Life by Chris Stokel-Walker (November 20, 2013)
Chris Stokel-Walker visits those living at 1:12 scale.
The Homebrew Computer Club’s crowdfunded reunion, Brittany Shoot says, is the future’s past.
Last Words by Glenn Fleishman (November 18, 2013)
“I love you,” his mother said, when he thought she was beyond speech, writes Glenn Fleishman.
The Unipiper by Chris Higgins (November 15, 2013)
Chris Higgins chases down Portland’s bagpiping, Darth Vader mask wearing, unicycling hero.
The Dork Knights by Ben Greenman (November 14, 2013)
A rivalry that zooms straight out of today’s pages.
Transit-Story Housing by Colleen Hubbard (November 13, 2013)
Carville was San Francisco’s streetcar neighborhood, Colleen Hubbard explains, where artists, lady bicyclists, and other bohemians hung out in 1900.
Here’s a radical idea: let’s talk about gentrification, without saying the word hipster, argues Rosie J. Spinks.
Tempura restaurants will unpretentiously dip anything in oil, Matthew Amster-Burton discovered while visiting Japan.
Memories of summers past and relics of our own lives, Jen A. Miller writes, can bring regret or warm our hearts.
Blinded by the Light by Chris Krupiarz (November 8, 2013)
A probe hurtling towards Mercury stops talking, as Messenger team member Chris Krupiarz recalls.
Originally appeared in Issue 29, November 7, 2013.
“Bonjour, sexy,” a man calls out to Rosie J. Spinks the moment she arrives in Paris. It never stops.
The Most Boring Machine by Mark Harris (November 6, 2013)
Seattle’s deep road tunnel is two miles of challenges, Mark Harris writes, and may not leave the city better off than the viaduct it replaces.
Tokyo Trash by Matthew Amster-Burton (November 3, 2013)
Sorting out the waste stream in Tokyo, Matthew Amster-Burton explains, is a complicated matter.